How to Write a Thesis Conclusion

How to Write a Thesis Conclusion

Your thesis conclusion should be the best part of your thesis. It is the last part of your thesis, and it shows that you have done some serious research on your subject. A lot of students tend to underestimate the importance of a good conclusion. Still, it shows your professor that you have understood the topic and completed all the procedures to arrive at an appropriate result.

It would help if you also thought about what message you want to leave in the reader’s mind after they have finished reading your paper. What do you want them to take away from it? What are some practical implications for what you have discovered?

This article will elaborate on how to write the thesis conclusion, what to include and how to present it professionally. If you’re confused by writing this section, contact us with “help me write my thesis,” We will avail our professional thesis writing help to you.

1. Restate and Summarize Your Work

Remember that a thesis conclusion is just as important as the other chapters of your dissertation. Therefore, it needs to be written in a way that allows you to sum up all the work you did in one chapter. To do this, you need to:

  • Summarize your key points and show how these have contributed to answering your dissertation question or proving your hypothesis;
  • Re-emphasize the significance of your research and why we should bother with it;
  • Answer the “so what” question – in other words, explain why this work matters;
  • Conclude by stating what was achieved by this research and describing its importance for future studies;
  • Avoid introducing new information in a thesis conclusion, and try not to repeat yourself.

2. Analyze Your Key Ideas

As you’re preparing to write your thesis conclusion, take some time to review the results of your research and analyze them closely. In this section of your thesis conclusion, you should explore how your findings match existing knowledge on the subject and what they might mean for academics or practitioners.

To do this well, ask yourself questions like:

  • Does my research challenge or confirm any theories? If so, what does this mean for the world at large?
  • How significant are my findings? What do they prove?
  • Could my research be applied to a practical situation in real life?

2. Analyze Your Key Ideas

As you’re preparing to write your thesis conclusion, take some time to review the results of your research and analyze them closely. In this section of your thesis conclusion, you should explore how your findings match existing knowledge on the subject and what they might mean for academics or practitioners.

To do this well, ask yourself questions like:

  • Does my research challenge or confirm any theories? If so, what does this mean for the world at large?
  • How significant are my findings? What do they prove?
  • Could my research be applied to a practical situation in real life?

3. Discuss the Relevance

This is where you show the reader how your work relates to a broader context. But what exactly does that mean? Well, imagine your thesis conclusion is like a huge circle. You have already done the research and analysis, presented your findings and ideas and discussed the results in great detail. Now you have to make the circle complete; there’s a gap that you need to fill in. How? Explain why your research matters for others or our world in general.

There are different ways of doing this:

  • Show how other people could benefit from using your work or implementing it into their lives (e.g., if you’ve shown that specific diets can help with depression, explain that anyone who suffers from depression could try them out).
  • Tell us about new questions or issues that have opened up as a result of what you’ve discovered (e.g., if you revealed some problems regarding existing therapies for childhood obesity, then suggest further solutions).
  • Discuss the importance of what you wrote on a more abstract level: What can it be used for? How is it connected to other fields of knowledge (e.g., psychology)?

4. Consider Any Limitations

It’s important, to be honest about any limitations in your research in the conclusion section of your thesis. Identifying and acknowledging weaknesses and limitations demonstrates a high level of maturity and independence as a researcher. It shows that you are familiar with the area you are writing about, and it also offers opportunities for further research.

However, it would help if you were careful not to undermine your study by pointing out obvious flaws in your research design. That will only make you look incompetent!

Identifying limitations can help highlight the gaps that exist in the current body of knowledge and demonstrate an awareness of how your study could contribute to filling them. This might include:

  • A lack of data or evidence on certain aspects of your topic
  • An unexpected statistical outcome due to limited sample size or other restrictions such as time constraints
  • Lack of access or availability to certain resources such as materials, equipment, data, or people

5. Make Recommendations for Future Research

The recommendations you make should be specific and feasible. They must also be related to the problem or issues you discussed in your paper.

A common mistake that students make when writing conclusions is covering too much ground by discussing irrelevant topics and ideas. Please focus on the subject of your paper and avoid straying from it.

6. End with a Closing Summary

The last part of your thesis, the conclusion, should be short and powerful. This section should summarize all the main points that you made in your paper. The conclusion is the final chance for you to prove to your reader why they should agree with you. However, do not repeat what was said previously in your paper or restate your thesis. You can also include a call to action or a recommendation in this section. If you have some room, revisit an impactful statement or quote representing your topic and find a way to weave it into here; this is a great way to end on an emotional and memorable note.

Final Thoughts

I know that I’ve said what seems like a million times already, but it’s worth repeating: the final words of your thesis should be short and sweet. If your introduction is around 1,000 words, you shouldn’t exceed 1,000 words for your conclusion.

A conclusion for an argumentative paper has the same basic elements as any other conclusion for an academic essay. In longer papers, conclusions may also contain recommendations for future research.

If you’re writing a good conclusion paragraph, you should remind your reader of what they have just read. Your goal is to leave the reader with the desire to want to learn more or the urge to research the topic more in their own free time. This is where having written and refined your introduction pays off. You get back what you put into it–if you try hard to make every part of your paper strong and attention-grabbing/useful/insightful/etc., readers will see that effort and hopefully enjoy reading the entire piece!

Get Help from our Experts with your Paper

If you’re looking for a little help with your paper, our specialists are on hand 24/7 to help you with formatting and proofreading. They can even help write your thesis conclusion if time is running out. If writing your thesis conclusion is the least of your worries at the moment, we can also offer help with any part of the thesis writing process—and that includes helping you right at the beginning to develop your research topic.

It’s easy to get in touch with us online; all you need to do is contact our support team, who can arrange a free quote or put you in touch with one of our professional writers if you prefer.